what is the first step in an alcoholics recovery

If you (or a loved one) are finally ready to confront an alcohol use disorder, you might wonder what is the first step in an alcoholic’s recovery. Read on to learn all about the detox and withdrawal process.

What is Alcohol Use Disorder?

Alcohol use disorder (AUD) refers to the long-term effects of continued heavy drinking. AUD is diagnosed on a continuum that ranges from mild to severe disease.

To determine if someone has an AUD, the NCADD has created an online questionnaire. It includes a list of common signs of AUD that you may recognize in yourself. The more symptoms that are present, the more severe the AUD:

  1. You avoid friends and family while drinking, preferring to drink alone.
  2. You consume higher quantities of alcohol as time goes on.
  3. You drink in response to stress, sadness, anger, or disappointment.
  4. You have hand tremors in the morning or have other withdrawal symptoms.
  5. You cannot remember things you said or did the night before.
  6. You are experiencing financial, legal, career, or family problems due to drinking.
  7. Your doctor advised you to cut down on alcohol.
  8. You lie about how much alcohol you drink.
  9. You are preoccupied during the day with drinking or crave alcohol.
  10. You get drunk several days in a row.

What Are the Signs Alcohol is Causing Harm in Your Life

There is no debate about the destructive nature of alcohol abuse. Some of the most common signs that your drinking habits are causing you to harm include:

  • Health problems. Alcohol is very toxic to the human body. Symptoms of health issues may emerge that are a direct result of heavy drinking. These include weight gain, heart problems, cognitive problems, liver disease, gastritis, and cancer.
  • Loss of job. You may lose your job, due to a decline in job performance, excessive absences, or drinking on the job. This can have far-reaching effects on your family finances.
  • Relationship problems. Alcoholism begins to demand all of your attention. As the AUD worsens, you spend more time drinking alone, and less time with your spouse and friends. This causes strain on the relationships, even leading to divorce.

Preparing for the Recovery Journey

Now that you have addressed the AUD and are getting ready to begin the recovery journey, there are some items to take care of. These include:

  • Take an extended leave of absence. Sit down with your employer to make a plan to take a leave of absence. Your job is protected by law.
  • Look up insurance coverage. Call your health plan provider to gather the details about what your plan covers. Most health plans now have at least some coverage for addiction treatment services.
  • Select a treatment program. Begin the process of choosing a rehab program. Your doctor can help guide you in terms of what level of care you will need.
  • Arrange for childcare, pet care, and bills to be paid. Get all your ducks in a row prior to leaving for detox and rehab. This helps your spouse manage things during your absence.

The First Step in Recovery: Alcohol Detox and Withdrawal

When starting out on the recovery journey, the first order of business is to rid the body of the toxins associated with alcohol. Detox lasts from a few days to a couple of weeks, depending on the severity and history of your AUD.

Alcohol detox involves three distinct stages. These stages include:

  • Stage 1: Emerging Symptoms. The early phase of withdrawal begins within 6-8 hours of the last drink. This stage lasts one day and includes the symptoms: stomach pain, nausea, vomiting, tremors, fatigue, anxiety, foggy thinking, and insomnia.
  • Stage 2: Peak Symptoms. The second phase of withdrawal involves symptoms peaking and lasts 2-4 days. Symptoms include increased heart rate, increased blood pressure, body temperature, and respiratory rate, mental confusion, sweating, mood swings, and irritability. Also, it is during this stage that delirium tremens (DTs) can develop, causing hallucinations, severe mental confusion, fever, and seizures.
  • Stage 3: Subsiding Symptoms. The final stage begins after day four and can persist for a couple of days to weeks. This stage is marked by depression, anxiety, confusion, insomnia, and cravings.

Keep in mind that throughout the detox process, your symptoms will be closely monitored and medications provided to minimize discomfort.

After Detox, What Comes Next?

Once you have completed the detox process, you are ready to enroll in the rehab portion of the recovery. Treatment is multi-pronged, with each activity building on the other to effect real change. Here is what you can expect in the rehab program:

  • Psychotherapy. Therapy is the main treatment element for alcohol recovery. Through therapy, you will examine any unhealthy behavior patterns that only perpetuate the alcohol addiction. Using CBT, the therapist guides you to reshape those thoughts and behaviors.
  • Family therapy. Family groups help the whole family unit heal and move forward together as their loved one enters recovery.
  • Education. Learning about the impact of alcohol on brain chemistry can be a deterrent to relapse. You will also be learning new coping tools and making a relapse prevention plan.
  • 12-step or similar. Peer support is a key element in recovery, and these meetings provide the opportunity to share experiences, challenges, fears, and goals with others in recovery.
  • Holistic. Rounding out rehabilitation are several activities that augment psychotherapy, including mindfulness training, yoga, art therapy, acupuncture, recreational therapy, equine therapy, and other activities that teach individuals relaxation techniques
  • Recreational therapy. Golf can be a very therapeutic addition to the rehab process. Spending time outdoors and getting exercise helps improve your mood and mindset.

Golf Drug Rehab Helps You Overcome Alcoholism

Golf Drug Rehab is a full-spectrum addiction treatment program that blends golf into the mix. If you are ready to that the first step in alcoholism recovery, give our team a call at (877) 958-5320.

how does meth affect the body

It may be shocking to learn the many ways that meth affects the body. This potent and destructive substance can wreak havoc on both physical and mental health. Read on to learn more about how meth affects the body.

What is Methamphetamine?

Methamphetamine (meth) is an illicit stimulant drug concocted with amphetamine and a variety of flammable household ingredients. These may include battery acid, drain cleaner, or paint thinner, all products that can cause an altered state of reality.

Meth is a potent and dangerous stimulant that can cause profound changes in the brain. Even after a single use, the brain’s reward pathways can be affected, leading the person to seek the drug again. After ongoing use, the brain begins to depend on the drug to stabilize the altered brain and provide dopamine.

The initial effects of meth include sensations of euphoria, alertness, energy, and a sense of wellbeing. However, there are also some adverse effects caused by meth use. These include:

  • Shortness of breath.
  • Hyperactivity, mania.
  • Tremors
  • Vomiting
  • Decreased appetite and weight loss.
  • Diarrhea
  • Insomnia

Meth is also referred to as crystal meth, speed, crystal, ice, and crank. The drug can be ingested in various ways, such as smoked, swallowed in pill form, snorted, or injected. The drug’s effects come on quickly and fade fairly fast, leading to continued abuse and eventually addiction.

Meth Addiction

Once someone becomes addicted to meth they will be unable to control their drug-seeking behaviors and meth use. This happens when the brain’s chemical makeup has been altered and natural dopamine production dwindles. Without the drug, the person no longer feels pleasure.

As addiction sets in, the person’s life will begin to unravel. Legal problems, job losses, stress, financial problems, child custody issues, and even homelessness are common among meth addicts.

Some of the signs of active meth addiction include:

  • Severe dental disease.
  • Skin sores from picking at invisible bugs.
  • Weight loss.
  • Droopy skin.
  • Insomnia
  • Angry or violent outbursts
  • Cognitive problems.
  • Aggressive behavior; angry outbursts.
  • Mental confusion.
  • Mood swings.
  • Depression
  • Anxiety
  • Paranoia
  • Psychosis

How Meth Affects the Body

Because meth is such a toxic substance, serious health conditions can develop as a result of addiction. The drug inflicts heavy damage to the body. Some of the effects of long-term meth abuse include:

  • Meth mouth.
  • Memory loss.
  • Increased risk of stroke
  • Hypertension.
  • Coronary artery disease
  • Cardiac arrest
  • Aortic dissection
  • Parkinson’s disease
  • Liver damage; increased risk of hep B and hep C
  • Increased risk of HIV/AIDS

Although some of the damage done to the brain and the body can be reversed, many will suffer long-term health effects even in recovery. Other long-term effects of recovery include feeling chronically tired and depressed.

What is Meth Mouth?

One of the most extreme effects of meth is a dental condition called “meth mouth.” The level of damage to the teeth will depend upon the duration and extent of the meth addiction. Meth mouth is often seen in heavy meth users, not those who use it on occasion. Meth mouth is more severe in women versus men.

Meth mouse is caused by dry mouth, a direct result of the meth addiction. Meth users may also grind their teeth, causing teeth to loosen or crack. It is also common for meth addicts to lose interest in taking care of their dental hygiene.

Signs and symptoms of meth mouth may include:

  • Poor overall dental health.
  • Loose teeth.
  • Sensitive teeth.
  • Inflamed gums.
  • Dry mouth and tongue.
  • Broken or fractured teeth.
  • Severe tooth decay.
  • Loss of teeth.

In many cases, the person waits too long before seeking the help of a dentist. By the time they reach out for help the damage is too extensive and the teeth can’t be saved. This often results in full mouth extractions and dentures.

Meth Detox and Withdrawal

Before you can break a meth habit, you will need to first complete the detox and withdrawal process. This is best done under the care of a detox team who will be able to assist you as symptoms arise. They have various meds they can use to help reduce discomfort.

Because meth is a synthetic drug, the withdrawal effects are more intense and ragged. The human body is not equipped to metabolize the dangerous and toxic ingredients contained in meth.

The withdrawal symptoms emerge within 12 hours of the last dosing. This is called the “meth comedown,” which refers to the period when the drug is wearing off. The person may experience the following symptoms:

  • Lethargy
  • Increased appetite.
  • Paranoia
  • Mental confusion.
  • Anxiety
  • Sleep disturbance.
  • Irritability
  • Agitation
  • Mood swings.
  • Intense depression.
  • Drug cravings.
  • Memory problems.
  • Thoughts of self-harm or suicide.

During meth withdrawal, the psychological symptoms are often worse than the physical symptoms. This is an added reason to only attempt meth detox under supervision, as there is a heightened risk of suicide.

Turn Your Life Around with Treatment and Recovery

Making the decision to get clean and sober after a meth addiction should come with the knowledge that you will need ongoing support. Starting with a structured treatment program, you will be guided toward learning ways to deflect compulsive drug seeking behaviors. Using one-on-one therapy, group therapy, 12-step groups, and addiction education, these programs can help you turn your life around.

Life is too short and too precious to waste it with a meth problem. Seeing how meth can affect the body may be a wake-up call for many. These are the long-term effects that people are largely unaware of when they take that first hit of meth. But now that you know meth’s affect on the body and you are ready to break free from its grip, reach out for help today.

Golf Drug Rehab Provides Luxury Meth Addiction Recovery Services

Golf Drug Rehab is an upscale addiction treatment center that offers help for those who struggle with meth. Our program features an evidence-based treatment approach combined with recreational golf. By mixing in some pleasure with the work of rehab, there is a greater chance you will complete the program. For more details, call us today at (877) 958-5320.

sober golf

Rehabilitation from drug or alcohol addiction is serious business. The process of detoxing the body from the presence of chemicals and toxins is not for the faint of heart. The active treatment portion of addiction recovery involves layers of multi-modal therapies that require focus, effort, and commitment for a sustained period of weeks or months. This is why sprinkling in a dose of recreational therapy in the form of sober golf is so welcome to those facing down the rehab process.

You remember in the movie, The Shining, Jack Nicholson’s character typed over and over “All work and no play makes Jack a dull boy.” Well, there is truth to his maniacal rant—hard work should indeed be balanced with some play. It is important to mix in some recreation during the time spent restoring mental and physical health, and addiction rehab with sober golf is a perfect pairing.

Sober golf is exactly what it says, playing golf without drinking or using drugs. It means enjoying the game in the purest, most natural way possible, fully alert and focused while getting sunshine and exercise in the process. Being outdoors on the course instantly lifts one’s mood, and the camaraderie at the heart of the game adds a positive dose of peer support in recovery.

How Addiction Rehab With Sober Golf Elevates the Rehab Experience

Let’s face it—no one looks forward to entering a drug or alcohol treatment program. That is plain fact. The experience is anxiety-provoking and difficult under even the best conditions. There is no bullet train to achieving sobriety; recovery is a long slog that will try your patience for years to come. But, as they say, the best things in life are worth fighting for, and when it comes to breaking free from the grip of addiction, it is life itself that is the ultimate prize.

So, that said, how can playing golf elevate the grind of the rehab experience? There is a multitude of ways that adding golf to the rehab menu will make the whole process more palatable. These include:

  • Recreational activities provide an opportunity to decompress from the serious work of therapy
  • Golf gives the client something enjoyable to look forward to during the rehab experience
  • Golf gets you outdoors, moving, smiling, chatting, and is a nice distraction from therapy
  • Golf provides an opportunity to build new friendships built on a mutual desire for sobriety

The Importance of Organized Recreation in Rehab

Recreational therapies such as golf can provide both physical and psychological benefits. In fact, the National Council for Therapeutic Recreation Certification defines recreational therapy as a systematic process that utilizes recreation and other activity-based interventions as a means to psychological and physical recovery and well-being. Therapeutic recreation can enhance mood, build confidence, and provide important opportunities to socialize. In addition, organized recreational activities, such as golf, are known to reduce stress and enhance relaxation, both important to addiction recovery.

Physical activity in rehab can help the brain as its chemistry rebalances and neurotransmitter production is normalized. This can have a protective effect against relapse, acting as a natural mood stabilizer. During rehab, clients can be still unstable as brain chemistry is rebounding to normal levels, so adding in recreational activities can help the process along.

How Addiction Rehab with Sober Golf Benefits the Newly Sober

Going to rehab can be depressing and may create a lot of stress for the client. Knowing that they will have to be away from work and their family for an extended period of time causes anxiety, as does the unknown of the rehab experience itself. Anticipating a lengthy period away from what is familiar to them, as well as preparing to give up their substance of choice, is indeed stressful.

By offering regular access to golf, the rehab entices the client into a more positive frame of mind that can enhance the effectiveness of the treatment. Clients who are positive and forward-thinking tend to have better recovery outcomes. They don’t look at rehab in a negative light, but as a means to an end—a healthy, sober lifestyle. For many people, golf is a passion. These folks thrive on the golf course, enjoying the challenges that a course throws at them and enjoying the company of friends while trying to successfully navigate the course. Sober golf only amplifies that positive experience by removing the inebriation and replacing it with the clear-headed engagement in the activity itself.

What to Expect in Addiction Treatment

While golf can compliment a rehab program and add some fun to the program, the foundational function of the rehab is to teach people how to not reach for the substance they have programmed their brains to crave. This is the serious part of the recovery process, the re-training of the mind and resulting behavioral responses. This brain reprogramming will take time, effort, and lots of patience.

In addiction treatment, you can expect to live a very structured existence for the duration of the program. There is a reason for this, and that is to help stabilize the client in early recovery, offering predictability, normal healthy routines, and constant engagement during each day. Generally, a treatment program will offer several different but complementary treatment elements. These typically include:

  • Psychotherapy sessions
  • Group therapy sessions
  • Classes that teach about how addiction develops
  • Relapse prevention planning
  • Motivational or informative guest speakers
  • Medication management
  • Experiential therapies, including recreational activities, yoga, meditation, mindfulness training, art therapy, acupuncture, journaling, and massage therapy

Golf Drug Rehab Offers Addiction Rehab With Sober Golf

Golf Drug Rehab is an upscale drug and alcohol addiction treatment program serving Orange County, California. Situated in a beautiful and serene coastal setting, Golf Drug Rehab provides an exclusive treatment experience that includes access to three premium golf courses in the local vicinity. The perfect combination of supervised detox, highly effective therapies, sober golf and other spa-like amenities allows clients to heal and regain their sense of self-worth. For more information about the program, please contact Golf Drug Rehab today at [phone_number]

Exercise and Addiction Recovery

If you are in early recovery for a drug or alcohol addiction chances are your body has seen better days. In active addiction, most people pay little attention to nutrition and exercise, leading to eventual vitamin deficiencies, a depleted immune system, and a paunchy physique as time and energy were diverted toward acquiring, using, and recovering from the drug of choice. Once the mind clears in sobriety and you begin to focus on the consequences of the addiction, you may be startled at the poor state of your physical health.

Thankfully, the body is resilient and, with some consistency and dedication to overall wellness, it can rebound. Making fitness a priority can provide a multitude of benefits for the individual in recovery. Exercise and addiction recovery is an excellent combination for renewing strength, confidence, and hope in achieving a fulfilling life.

Exercise and Addiction Recovery: The Protective Effects of Physical Activity

While it has been widely understood in the recovery field for years that exercise is beneficial to individuals in addiction recovery, there is actual research that helps indicate how and why that is. In an article by Mark A. Smith and Wendy J. Lynch published in Frontiers in Psychology entitled “Exercise as a Potential Treatment for Drug Abuse: Evidence from Preclinical Studies,” the authors explain how epidemiological studies, or how certain determinants can influence disease development or progression, demonstrate the protective effects of exercise for the recovering addict. The article states that “Collectively, these studies have provided convincing evidence to support the development of exercise-based interventions to reduce compulsive patterns of drug intake in clinical and at-risk populations.”

In their study featuring rats who had access to a running wheel in the home cage, they found that the effects of running lasted beyond the exercise period, reducing the rats drug-seeking behavior after a period of abstinence. This, they posit, demonstrates how exercise may be effective at preventing relapse. They conclude by stating that the neurobiological effects of exercise can serve as an alternative non-drug reinforcer of sobriety.

How Early in Recovery Should Exercise Begin?

Considering the multiple realms that exercise and addiction recovery seem to work in tandem for positive outcomes, there is no reason to delay integrating regular physical activity into the recovery process. Starting in rehab, where most programs provide recreational activities or a gym, the individual can begin the process of restoring physical health while enjoying the psychological benefits of exercise.

Cardio-based activities such as walking, jogging, cycling, dance fitness, running, and swimming are excellent options to include in the recovery routine. Cardio or aerobic, exercise involves the pumping of oxygenated blood by the heart, delivering it to the working muscles. This works the lungs, heart, and muscles simultaneously, providing many health benefits.

5 Benefits of Exercise in Recovery

When you set aside a certain amount of time each week for physical activity you are sending a subliminal message to yourself that you care about your health and wellbeing. As the results of regular exercise start to become apparent, it will inspire you to continue on this positive, healthy trajectory in recovery. The primary benefits of combining exercise and addiction recovery include:

  1. Decreases stress while increasing resilience to stress. Stress is the number one foe of someone in early recovery, having the potential to induce a relapse. Regular physical activity will improve circulation and release brain chemicals leading to stress reduction. Over time, pushing oneself physically can create stronger mental stamina over stressful situations.
  2. Improves overall mood. It will take time to correct brain chemistry so that it will begin producing dopamine naturally again. Meanwhile, exercise is known to cause a release of endorphins and serotonin, boosting mood naturally.
  3. Boosts confidence. The sense of accomplishment that you get from completing a task, even a round of golf or a brisk walk, can help boost confidence in yourself. As you get stronger and begin to feel better, you slowly build up a renewed sense of self-worth.
  4. Promotes physical health. Just getting outside and moving your body can begin the process of restoring health. Regular exercise has enormous positive effects on all bodily systems, improving heart health, stamina, energy level, muscle strength, joint mobility, and increased immune response.
  5. Improves sleep quality. Regular physical activity helps to regulate body temperature, reduce stress, and promote relaxation, all beneficial to getting quality sleep. The energy expended in exercise can translate to getting more hours of sleep as well.

Golf Drug Rehab Incorporates Golf and Fitness Into Addiction Recovery Program

Golf Drug Rehab is a luxury rehabilitation center located in Orange County, California. As implied in the name of the program, Golf Drug Rehab places an emphasis on the fitness component of recovery, offering access to three deluxe golf courses in the local vicinity for its clients. Golf Drug Rehab combines outdoor activity with a powerful arsenal of proven evidence-based therapies for excellent recovery results. For more information about how the program meshes exercise and addiction recovery, please contact Golf Drug Rehab today at [phone_number]

Am I an Alcoholic

Alcohol abuse, alcohol addiction, alcohol dependency—with so many terms referencing an alcohol use disorder it may make the actual definition of alcoholism seem murky and confusing.  In reality, alcoholism is a complex substance use disorder with various features that help define the severity of the problem, or whether the alcohol use, although excessive, even reaches the clinical definition of the disease.

According to the definition of alcoholism by the Merriam-Webster dictionary, alcoholism is:

  1. Continued excessive or compulsive use of alcoholic drinks
  2. a.  Chronic, progressive, potentially fatal disorder marked by excessive and usually compulsive drinking leading to psychological and physical dependence or addiction
  3.  Acute alcohol poisoning resulting from the usually rapid consumption of excessive alcoholic beverages

Well, this serves as a starting point in understanding the nuances of alcoholism, but still allows for different interpretations of what exactly constitutes alcoholism.  If you are asking yourself “Am I an alcoholic” or “Do I need addiction treatment” then this blog may offer some helpful information.

What Exactly is Alcoholism?

It is difficult to know whether someone is an alcoholic or just

a problem drinker.  Some people can abuse alcohol for years without developing alcohol dependence. Others may be high-functioning alcoholics, able to be successful at a career and fulfilling family obligations even though they consume high amounts of alcohol.  Eventually, however, abusing alcohol for an extended time period will take a toll one way or another. Health will be impacted, cognitive decline occurs, or there might be a DUI arrest that creates legal headaches—even if the individual never became alcoholic in the classical sense.

Risk Factors For Alcoholism

So why is it that some heavy drinkers become alcoholics and others do not?  There are some risk factors for alcoholism that can predispose an individual to become an alcoholic.  The genetic component is one such factor. If someone has a strong family history of alcoholism there is a much higher probability that they could also become an alcoholic.  A co-occurring mental health disorder, such as depression, bipolar disorder, or generalized anxiety can also result in alcohol dependence, as the individual seeks to numb emotional pain or symptoms of anxiety.

A series of difficult life events, such as losing a loved one, divorce, losing a job, or experiencing or witnessing trauma can all contribute to depending on alcohol to soothe the emotional symptoms that are experienced as a result of the negative events.  

So, Am I an Alcoholic?

There are behavioral symptoms that an addiction is forming that can serve as warning signs.  These might include:

  • Obsessing over when you can drink next or how to obtain the alcohol
  • Trying to quit drinking and cannot
  • Withdrawing from friends and family
  • Loss of interest in the activities once enjoyed
  • Drinking more and more alcohol as tolerance increases
  • Mood swings
  • Losing interest in maintaining personal appearance and hygiene
  • Irritability
  • Concentration problems
  • Sleep disturbances
  • Alcohol cravings
  • When an attempt to quit drinking withdrawal symptoms emerge

10 Signs that Help Answer the Question, “Am I an Alcoholic?”

There are some universal signs that someone has crossed into alcoholism.  The National Council on Alcoholism and Drug Dependence (NCADD) has an online questionnaire that can help you determine if you have a problem with alcohol.  Among the points the NCADD includes are:

  1. You avoid friends and family while drinking
  2. You consume higher quantities of alcohol as time goes on
  3. You drink in response to stress, sadness, anger, or disappointment
  4. You have hand tremors in the morning
  5. You cannot remember things you said or did the night before
  6. You are experiencing financial, legal, career, or family problems due to drinking
  7. Your doctor advised you to cut down on alcohol
  8. You lie about how much alcohol you drink
  9. You are preoccupied during the day with drinking or crave alcohol
  10. You get drunk several days in a row

Treatment for Alcoholism

Getting treatment for an alcohol use disorder is life changing.  After completing detox, you will enter into an extended period of active treatment during which you will immerse yourself in a variety of therapeutic activities that all work together to help you overcome the alcoholism.  This will include individual talk therapy with a clinical psychotherapist who will guide you in examining any past traumas or emotional pain that might be driving the need to drink. Group therapy sessions allow a peer support system to develop where clients can help each other and share experiences.  Medications, such as naltrexone, can be used for the early phase of recovery to help reduce alcohol cravings. Recreational therapies, such as yoga, hiking, exercise sessions, golf, tennis, or surfing can take some pressure off and infuse some social activities during treatment.

Golf Drug Rehab Provides Superior Alcohol Use Disorder Treatment in Southern California

Golf Drug Rehab is a luxury drug and alcohol addiction treatment program in California.  The expert and compassionate clinical staff at Golf Drug Rehab is highly trained in detox and addiction treatment for individuals in need of help for an alcohol use disorder.  Offering the very latest treatment modalities and three amazing golf courses to help clients enjoy some recreational therapy, Golf Drug Rehab provides the perfect blend of therapy and golf.  If you are wondering “Am I an alcoholic?” or have questions about our program, call Golf Drug Rehab today at [phone_number].

detox centers

As wonderful as it may seem to spend a week relaxing at a luxury detox center, especially one that is located in a gorgeous, tranquil setting, the hard reality is that detox serves a serious, and potentially life-saving, purpose.  The high-end trappings do indeed make the detox mission more comfortable, for sure.

Private rooms, a variety of amenities, and plenty of oversight and personal attention can make the detoxification process at least palatable.  But most important, the upscale detox center will provide the supervision and care that will safely guide you through the detox and withdrawal stage of early addiction recovery and into an effective treatment program.

The Benefits of a Luxury Detox Centers

A luxury detox center integrates the same level of premium features that you would expect to find at a high-end spa or retreat.  Offering uncompromising luxury to its clients, these premier detoxification programs can truly make the detox experience go more smoothly.  Just knowing that your needs will be met and that you will be staying in luxurious quarters can be very comforting to prospective clients.

Some of the benefits of a luxury detox center include:

  • A more intimate setting.  Fewer clients mean they will receive a higher level of attention while progressing through the detox process.  With few clients, there is less crowding in common areas, making the experience more relaxing and less stressful, as well as offering more personalized care.
  • Location.  In most cases, private luxury detox programs are situated in highly desirable geographical settings, such as coastal communities, desert resort locales, or mountain retreats, offering a sense of serenity.
  • Amenities.  Luxury detox and treatment centers pay close attention to creature comforts, offering deluxe accommodations and plenty of spa-like services.  They may have a gourmet chef on staff or offer organic, locally-sourced cuisine.
  • Holistic therapies.  Many luxury detox centers feature relaxation-promoting experiential therapies, such as acupuncture, mindfulness meditation, and art therapy.

How Your Privacy is Protected in Detox

Stigma continues to be an unwelcome reality when it comes to someone getting professional help for a drug or alcohol addiction.  Many professionals in high-profile positions put off getting treatment due to the concern that their rehab stint might become known, which they fear could jeopardize their career.  Private luxury detox and addiction treatment programs are very committed to protecting the privacy and confidentiality of their clients.

In addition, there are laws that prohibit a rehab or detox center from releasing any patient records without the client’s written consent.  Reputable rehab programs vigilantly protect clients’ privacy and their dignity, prioritizing discretion at all times.

What to Expect in Detox

Detox provides additional safety measures that may not be offered at other types of detox facilities, and certainly not at home if the individual attempts to self-detox.  There is good reason for personnel to be available during drug or alcohol detoxification, as emergency events can suddenly emerge. A supervised detox offers the most supportive environment for the client as they process through detox and withdrawal, seeing to their needs throughout the phases of detox.

The degree of discomfort while going through detox will depend on the client’s addiction severity, age, their general state of physical health, whether they have a mental health disorder, and how long the addiction has been in place.  Different substances of abuse have different withdrawal symptoms, but in most cases, detox tends to progress through three stages:

Stage 1:  The first signs of withdrawal symptoms will commence between 6-12 hours after the last alcoholic drink or drug dosing.  Emerging symptoms will be unpleasant but not severe.

Stage 2:  Withdrawal symptoms tend to reach their peak at about days 2-3 of the process, during which the symptoms can be immensely uncomfortable or painful.  In addition, psychological symptoms, such as anxiety, depression, hallucinations, and psychosis can exacerbate this difficult stage of detox.

Stage 3:  From days 4-7 the majority of the withdrawal symptoms will begin to subside dramatically, as the body expels the toxins from the body.  Some symptoms will linger for weeks but are usually managed by medications.

During the duration of the detox, interventions will be introduced by the detox team that can dramatically reduce the discomfort of the withdrawal symptoms.  The goal of the detox professionals is to provide the maximum level of comfort possible in order to guide the client through the detox phase and into active treatment immediately following.

Golf Drug Rehab Offers Luxury Detox and a Private Setting

Golf Drug Rehab is a premier executive drug and alcohol treatment program in California that caters to the discerning individual who is accustomed to premium services.  An expert detox team will carefully monitor vital signs and withdrawal symptoms throughout the detox procedure. Our detox professionals will provide maximum comfort and emotional support during the detox and withdrawal process.  Following detox, Golf Drug Rehab offers a unique addiction treatment program that melds the most effective therapies and treatment modalities with high-end golf, providing access to three stellar golf courses to add some recreational therapy into the mix.  For more information about our program, please contact Golf Drug Rehab today at [phone_number].

Stages of Addiction Recovery

Wouldn’t it be wonderful if you could just wave a magic wand and be miraculously cured of a drug or alcohol addiction?  In reality, though, the recovery journey is not so short and sweet, but actually involves a complete change in mindset and lifestyle with an eye toward a rewarding and fulfilling future—and that takes time.

Addiction recovery is as varied and unique as the individual entering into it, with a multitude of factors influencing the recovery experience.  In most cases, however, there are 5 distinct stages of addiction recovery that are commonly traversed.  Having an awareness of them can be both informative and comforting—especially to the loved ones who will benefit from knowing what to expect as they travel the journey alongside you.

What Are the 5 Stages of Addiction Recovery?

The road to recovery will look different for everyone, but most addiction treatment professionals recognize the process evolving in 5 distinct stages.  These stages include:

Stage One:  Awareness and Early Acknowledgment

On the surface, stage one may not actually look like a recovery at all.  During this first stage, the individual is still using the substance of choice but is becoming aware that his or her substance abuse is becoming problematic.  They may be experiencing negative consequences of the addictive behaviors, such as problems at home, at work, and even legal issues, but haven’t really committed to making a change.  However, at some point during stage one, a shift occurs from being in denial about the problem to becoming aware that an actionable step must take place, and slowly developing a willingness to take that step.

Stage Two:  Contemplation

Though not yet involved in pursuing recovery, stage two features an important change in focus from self to how the addiction is impacting loved ones.  They may begin to actively study the disease of addiction, as well as start to gather resource material about detox and addiction treatment.  They may mention quitting at some point, but it is usually a vague comment without a time reference.  Toward the end of stage two, the addict begins to shift from knowing they need to take action to actually doing it.

Stage Three:  Exploring and Preparing for Recovery

Stage three marks the turning point when someone actually enters the active recovery mode.  This preparatory stage features exploring what the recovery process looks like, and how a life of abstinence looks and may begin to educate themselves on treatment options.  Some during this stage will reach out to people in their life who have been in recovery from drug or alcohol addiction to ask about how it works and gain encouragement from them.

Stage Four:  Taking Action and Early Recovery

This early phase of recovery involves going through detox and then entering an addiction treatment program in hopes of overcoming the addiction.  While stage four is a positive development in the recovery process, it is also one with significant challenges.  Learning to live life without the crutch of a substance is difficult in early recovery.  The individual may experience loss, as they make changes in their circle of friends and daily activities in order to protect their recovery.  During stage four relapse is very common as the recovery process is still under construction.  Using the newfound coping skills and behavioral changes takes time to become entrenched in new healthy habits.

Stage Five:  Maintenance

Stage five represents the point when recovery begins to feel good.  The individual now accepts that they must be ever vigilant about guarding their sobriety by avoiding triggers and accessing their support system.  They understand that they will always be an addict and respect the power of addiction as something they must continue to manage for the rest of their life.  By this stage, they are experiencing the positive rewards of hanging in there and persisting in remaining clean and sober.

The Importance of the Support System

The process of addiction recovery may involve twists and turns, and even some detours.  Having a cadre of friends and family members, as well as a sponsor, can make or break recovery.  By rebuilding trust with loved ones and showing them by your actions that you are fully committed to recovery, chances are these significant others will rally around you and not abandon you when you need them most.  Nurture these relationships and access their support, especially during early recovery when it is so tenuous.  There is no doubt that no one wants you to succeed as much as these people.

Golf Drug Rehab Guides You Through the 5 Stages of Addiction Recovery

Golf Drug Rehab is a high end luxury rehab located on the coast of Southern California near Orange County, Los Angeles, San Diego, and Riverside areas.  The expert clinical staff will walk you through the 5 stages of addiction recovery with compassion and respect.  In addition to the proven therapeutic interventions, Golf Drug Rehab combines recovery with enjoyment by providing access to three spectacular local golf courses.  For more information about the rehab program, contact the staff at Golf Drug Rehab today at [phone_number].

workaholic and alcoholic

Are Workaholics Alcoholic?

The fast-paced life of a busy executive can clearly seem out of control when viewed by the casual observer. These driven professionals aim for the top with an über-focused fervor, fueled by the passion to succeed at their chosen career. What many do not see, however, is the coping method used to quiet their sky-high stress level: alcohol.

Workaholic and alcoholic—these two terms conjure up a harried, compulsive, type-A individual with a bottle of booze hidden in the desk drawer. Relying on a nip here or there throughout the day can morph into a much more serious problem as tolerance to alcohol’s effects increase, demanding more than a nip to reach the calm state desired. Therein lies the problem; the use of alcohol to induce relaxation due to job stress and anxiety can end up backfiring in a big way.

As the need for higher levels of alcohol consumption incrementally increases, the brain, in turn, is busy altering neurotransmitters and neural pathways in response. This invisible process can creep up on a person, when suddenly, one morning, the first signs of a problem are evident. Maybe it is hand tremors. Maybe it is nausea or profuse sweating. Whichever the withdrawal symptom that initially emerges, this is the warning sign that alcoholism is taking root.

Shared Traits of the Workaholic and Alcoholic

The workaholic and alcoholic tend to exist side by side. The same traits that might cause a person to become addicted to their work parallel similar traits observed in the alcoholic.

Signs of a workaholic might include:

  • Obsessive thoughts about work
  • Feeling compulsively driven to work more and more hours
  • Allowing work to interfere with interpersonal relationships
  • Neglecting family obligations
  • Withdrawing socially as work envelops all waking hours
  • Stress-related health problems develop

Signs of an alcoholic might include:

  • Obsessing about the next drink, having alcohol available, obtaining alcohol
  • Compulsive drinking, unable to control the consumption of alcohol
  • Drinking negatively impacts relationships
  • Neglecting family obligations
  • Withdrawing socially, drinking alone, the world revolves around drinking
  • Alcohol-related health problems develop
  • Want to quit drinking but cannot
  • Experience withdrawal symptoms when alcohol is absent

How Cognitive Behavioral Therapy Helps Workaholics and Alcoholics

The reflexive mechanism that drives compulsive behaviors involves both the mind (cognitive) and actions (behavioral). Cognitive Behavioral Therapy (CBT) is a mode of psychotherapy that helps individuals who struggle with compulsions, whether they be work or alcohol consumption, learn how to shift the thought-behavior patterns away from self-destructive actions toward productive, healthy actions.

CBT guides the individual to identify the distorted self-messaging that is acted on through subsequent alcohol abuse or the compulsive working. For example, a workaholic may tell him or herself that “unless I put in 18-hour days I will never be promoted,” which results in compulsive work actions. An alcoholic may tell him or herself that “No way can I deal with the pressure of this day on my own,” which results in compulsive alcohol misuse.

By reframing the internal dialogue, CBT can help individuals make fundamental shifts in their thought-behavior patterns. It teaches the person to be mindful of the moment, to pause, and shift the thought toward a positive message. For example, the workaholic may feel a rush of anxiety around career advancement. This feeling is acknowledged, then followed with “I will continue to deliver my best work while remaining cognizant of my own wellness,” which results in self-regulation of work hours. The alcoholic might feel overwhelmed by anxiety in a given situation, and pauses to acknowledge this mental state, followed by the thought “I need to do some deep breathing right now and rein in my thoughts to this present moment.” This results in active efforts to calm the mind using both mindfulness and deep breathing, which will result in decreased cortisol and adrenaline and a calmer state of being without resorting to alcohol.

CBT is a highly effective therapeutic strategy that produces significant results in a short-term format. CBT can be used in both individual and group settings and is a core treatment element in addiction recovery.

Getting Help For Alcoholism

It isn’t easy to accept that one may have developed a problem with alcohol. When those first withdrawal symptoms appear, it can come as a shock. But the fact is that the earlier someone seeks treatment for an alcohol use disorder, the better their recovery outcome. Alcohol addiction will only escalate toward alcohol dependency, which is a chronic, relapsing, and usually fatal disease.

Detox. When approaching treatment for alcoholism it is important to understand that the first step in recovery, detoxification, must be completed under the supervision of a trained detox team. Attempting to detox on one’s own can present serious, even fatal, health risks, including the seizures and coma associated with the delirium tremens (DTs). Alcohol withdrawal symptoms will vary in severity depending on such factors as the length of time abusing alcohol, the level of alcohol consumption, presence of a coexisting mental health disorder like depression or anxiety, a polydrug addiction, and the general health status of the individual.

Withdrawal symptoms for a workaholic and alcoholic might include:

  • Nausea and vomiting
  • Sweating
  • Hand tremors, shaking
  • Racing heart
  • Elevated blood pressure
  • Headache
  • Irritability
  • Agitation
  • Insomnia
  • Anxiety
  • Mental confusion
  • Psychosis
  • Seizures
  • DTs

Treatment. Alcohol treatment can be obtained in either an outpatient or residential setting and will involve a number of coordinated therapies. Rehab usually includes individual therapy, group therapy, family-focused therapy, medication management when applicable, addiction education, relapse prevention planning, adjunctive therapies, recreational therapy, nutritional counseling, and holistic activities.

Aftercare. Following completion of the rehab program, the individual should access continuing care services to help reinforce sobriety. These include ongoing outpatient therapy, sober living housing, and 12-step or non 12-step meetings.

Golf Drug Rehab Luxury Alcohol Recovery Center in Orange County

Golf Drug Rehab provides the most effective evidence-based therapies for treating alcohol use disorders, as well as naltrexone therapy, in some cases, to further reinforce recovery. Learn how to free yourself from life as a workaholic and alcoholic while also enjoying three spectacular golf courses while in treatment. For more information, please contact Golf Drug Rehab today at [phone_number].

effects of quitting drinking timeline

Examining the Stages of Alcohol Detox and Withdrawal

When considering treatment for an alcohol addiction one of the biggest deterrents to following through is the fear of going through the detox process. Alcohol detoxification involves a period of about 5-7 days following cessation of drinking when the toxins related to alcohol are purged from the body. During this timeframe, the body and brain will attempt to recalibrate and stabilize as it adjusts to the absence of alcohol. Alcohol detox is an unpleasant phase of recovery, but a necessary first step on the journey to living a satisfying sober life.

Understanding the effects of quitting drinking timeline can help prepare someone for what to expect, as well as assure them that a detox program will make medications available to ease the withdrawal symptoms throughout the process. Knowing that they will be closely monitored and will receive interventions as needed goes a long way toward easing anxiety related to the detox experience.

What Happens During Alcohol Detox?

When an individual has a long history of excessive alcohol consumption their brain chemistry is altered as a result. By the time the person is addicted to alcohol, the brain has turned over the job of dopamine production to the alcohol and ceases to produce it naturally anymore. Alcoholism alters many other bodily systems over time as well. Because of these adaptations, when alcohol intake is interrupted by the decision to get sober the body scrambles to adjust. This period of adjustment and stabilization is the detoxification phase of recovery.

Alcohol withdrawal symptoms start off feeling like a bad hangover, but quickly escalate in severity. In fact, alcohol detox does carry risks and should always be supervised by trained detox professionals who can quickly manage any urgent health event that might arise. These providers will ensure that the detox process goes as smoothly as possible by administering needed medications as the withdrawal symptoms dictate. Benzodiazepines are offered to minimize the risk of seizures, aid in managing anxiety, and also help promote sleep. Other medications will manage gastrointestinal distress, headache, and fever.

What Are the Stages of Alcohol Detox?

Alcohol detox and withdrawal can vary dramatically from one individual to another. The factors that influence how severe the withdrawal symptoms might include the length of time the person engaged in heavy drinking, how much they would typically drink in a day, their age, whether there are conditions, and if there is a co-occurring mental health disorder. For this reason, the effects of quitting drinking timeline described here are just a general template, as each person will experience variations of it.

Mild Stage: Once an individual has stopped drinking they can expect withdrawal symptoms to emerge at about the 8-hour mark. The withdrawal symptoms in the first stage of detox include:

  • Sweating
  • Fuzzy thinking
  • Nausea
  • Vomiting
  • Hand tremors
  • Headache
  • Anxiety
  • Restlessness
  • Clammy skin
  • Fatigue
  • Irritability
  • Depression
  • Mood swings
  • Loss of appetite

Moderate Stage: Within 12-48 hours withdrawal symptoms begin to become intensified. It is important that vital signs are constantly monitored at this point as symptoms can suddenly become problematic. The withdrawal symptoms in this middle stage include:

  • Elevated blood pressure
  • Irregular heartbeat
  • Profuse sweating
  • Fever
  • Mental confusion
  • Irritability
  • Changes in respiratory rate

Severe Stage: Days two and three are the time during alcohol detox when symptoms can suddenly become dangerous. Most will not experience these severe symptoms, but individuals with a long history of heavy alcohol consumption and co-occurring health issues are at the highest risk of the most severe withdrawals called delirium tremens (DTs). The withdrawal symptoms during the late stage of detox include:

  • Fever
  • Hallucinations
  • Delirium
  • Trembling
  • Agitation
  • Confusion
  • Seizures

Comprehensive Treatment For Alcohol Addiction

It is an error to believe that all that is needed to enjoy a long-lasting recovery is to go through detox and withdrawal. This is not the case! After successfully completing the effects of quitting drinking timeline there is some additional work to be done. Until the alcoholic learns how to change their addictive behaviors, and this is done through extensive individual and group therapy, they will simply return to drinking once the cravings return.

Addiction treatment covers a range of therapies and classes that equip the recovering alcoholic with coping tools, conflict resolution skills, stress-reduction techniques, relapse prevention planning, and a recovery community. These integrated treatment elements prepare the individual for managing life without alcohol, giving them the best shot at sustained, life-affirming recovery.

Golf Drug Rehab Provides Detox for Alcohol Addiction Recovery

Golf Drug Rehab is an upscale addiction treatment program serving Orange County, California. Understanding the effects of quitting drinking timeline, and how to mitigate withdrawal symptoms, the expert detox staff will safely guide clients through the detox phase of treatment. Following detox, a comprehensive addiction treatment program will provide the client with the means to remain sober, including psychotherapy, coping skills, stress reduction techniques, holistic tools, and relapse prevention strategizing. Golf Drug Rehab is unique in its blending of evidence-based treatment methods with recreational golf to round out the program. For more information about the program, please contact Golf Drug Rehab today at [phone_number].

What is the Best Treatment for Alcoholism

One glance at a Google search result for alcohol addiction treatment could make a person sit there cross-eyed in front of the computer, trying to decipher, out of the thousands listed, what is the best treatment for alcoholism. It is mind-boggling just how many different types of rehabs there are nowadays. They sport varying core philosophies and treatment methods, as well as a plethora of adjunctive therapies and complementary activities. We sit there staring at the computer and scratching our heads, unsure of which rehab will provide the best shot of actually working for you or your loved one’s alcohol addiction. So what is the best treatment for alcoholism anyway?

Heads Up: Not a One-Size-Fits-All

Any rehab that claims that their boilerplate program is the answer to someone’s alcohol addiction should be eliminated from consideration. These rehabs have a rigid, standardized approach to treatment that basically stuffs all variants and all drug and alcohol addictions into one crisp program. For them it is efficient and simplified, for the client it is a failure waiting to happen.

Addiction treatment must be tailored according to the many factors that make each individual’s struggle unique. This means that the 20-something person with an opioid addiction will require a different treatment approach than a 50-something alcoholic with co-occurring depression. By not acknowledging the specific needs of the client, by not creating a fully individualized treatment plan for their unique recovery needs, a rehab is setting the person up for an unsuccessful attempt at sobriety.

Any alcohol rehab worth its salt will provide a wide array of treatment elements and adjunctive therapies and activities that can be pulled from to design an integrated treatment plan for each individual client. This is a deal-breaker, so ask the pertinent question—How customized are your treatment plans?”—when seeking treatment.

The Amazing Role of Naltrexone

The dark horse in alcoholism treatment is the growing popularity of the medication-assisted treatment, which for alcohol addiction means naltrexone (Vivitrol, Revia). Naltrexone has the ability to significantly reduce alcohol cravings, one of the most common triggers for relapse—which for alcoholics is usually chronic relapsing.  Naltrexone works by attaching to the opioid receptors in the brain and somehow decreases the reinforcing effects of how alcohol impacts the neural pathways.

Naltrexone is introduced after detoxification is successfully completed in order to avoid serious withdrawal symptoms occurring. The drug is available in pill form, as a patch, or as an injectable and should be closely monitored by a professional. Someone who is using naltrexone as one part of a comprehensive approach to recovery, which includes ongoing psychotherapy, sober living housing, and participation in a recovery community, will greatly increase their chances of achieving sustained sobriety.

How Motivation Enhancement Works

Research has shown that individuals in treatment for alcoholism are responsive to a type of therapy called Motivational Enhancement Therapy (MET). This type of behavioral therapy uses a reward system to help reinforce sobriety. The short-term therapy begins with an initial assessment battery session with a clinician, the results of which are discussed with the individual seeking treatment. The discussion leads the client to create a plan of action, to make changes based on a self-motivated desire to change their behavior. Through the course of the sessions, the therapist offers coping strategies to assist the client in achieving the goals, while encouraging the client to continue forward.

Other Effective Treatments for Alcohol Addiction Treatment

Considering what is the best treatment for alcoholism, another excellent therapy that alcoholics are particularly responsive to is cognitive-behavioral therapy (CBT). Because alcohol abuse may begin initially as a means of self-medication, CBT helps the client identify the distorted thought patterns (my life is worthless, no one loves me, I am a failure, etc.) that led to the maladaptive behavioral response to using alcohol to numb these disturbing thoughts. The therapist guides the client toward shifting these self-defeating thoughts toward positive, affirming thoughts that result in constructive behaviors.

Adjunctive therapies and complementary activities, such as acupuncture, biofeedback, yoga, and mindfulness training are also helpful in alcohol addiction treatment. These types of activities augment, or enhance the effects of the psychotherapy by adding another dimension to the treatment plan. A rehab that emphasizes nutrition and regular exercise is also helpful to the alcoholic who will need to restore health and vitality in recovery.

Golf Drug Rehab Offers Cutting Edge Alcoholism Treatment

Golf Drug Rehab is a premium addiction treatment program serving Southern California. At Golf Drug Rehab our clinical staff embraces the use of naltrexone for assisting clients in overcoming the grip of alcoholism. Combined with evidence-based therapies, such as cognitive-behavioral therapy and Motivation Enhancement, Golf Drug Rehab adds golf therapy to the menu for a well-rounded rehab experience. If you wonder what is the best treatment for alcoholism, you have found your rehab. For more information about the program, please call Golf Drug Rehab today at [phone_number].