what is the first step in an alcoholics recovery

If you (or a loved one) are finally ready to confront an alcohol use disorder, you might wonder what is the first step in an alcoholic’s recovery. Read on to learn all about the detox and withdrawal process.

What is Alcohol Use Disorder?

Alcohol use disorder (AUD) refers to the long-term effects of continued heavy drinking. AUD is diagnosed on a continuum that ranges from mild to severe disease.

To determine if someone has an AUD, the NCADD has created an online questionnaire. It includes a list of common signs of AUD that you may recognize in yourself. The more symptoms that are present, the more severe the AUD:

  1. You avoid friends and family while drinking, preferring to drink alone.
  2. You consume higher quantities of alcohol as time goes on.
  3. You drink in response to stress, sadness, anger, or disappointment.
  4. You have hand tremors in the morning or have other withdrawal symptoms.
  5. You cannot remember things you said or did the night before.
  6. You are experiencing financial, legal, career, or family problems due to drinking.
  7. Your doctor advised you to cut down on alcohol.
  8. You lie about how much alcohol you drink.
  9. You are preoccupied during the day with drinking or crave alcohol.
  10. You get drunk several days in a row.

What Are the Signs Alcohol is Causing Harm in Your Life

There is no debate about the destructive nature of alcohol abuse. Some of the most common signs that your drinking habits are causing you to harm include:

  • Health problems. Alcohol is very toxic to the human body. Symptoms of health issues may emerge that are a direct result of heavy drinking. These include weight gain, heart problems, cognitive problems, liver disease, gastritis, and cancer.
  • Loss of job. You may lose your job, due to a decline in job performance, excessive absences, or drinking on the job. This can have far-reaching effects on your family finances.
  • Relationship problems. Alcoholism begins to demand all of your attention. As the AUD worsens, you spend more time drinking alone, and less time with your spouse and friends. This causes strain on the relationships, even leading to divorce.

Preparing for the Recovery Journey

Now that you have addressed the AUD and are getting ready to begin the recovery journey, there are some items to take care of. These include:

  • Take an extended leave of absence. Sit down with your employer to make a plan to take a leave of absence. Your job is protected by law.
  • Look up insurance coverage. Call your health plan provider to gather the details about what your plan covers. Most health plans now have at least some coverage for addiction treatment services.
  • Select a treatment program. Begin the process of choosing a rehab program. Your doctor can help guide you in terms of what level of care you will need.
  • Arrange for childcare, pet care, and bills to be paid. Get all your ducks in a row prior to leaving for detox and rehab. This helps your spouse manage things during your absence.

The First Step in Recovery: Alcohol Detox and Withdrawal

When starting out on the recovery journey, the first order of business is to rid the body of the toxins associated with alcohol. Detox lasts from a few days to a couple of weeks, depending on the severity and history of your AUD.

Alcohol detox involves three distinct stages. These stages include:

  • Stage 1: Emerging Symptoms. The early phase of withdrawal begins within 6-8 hours of the last drink. This stage lasts one day and includes the symptoms: stomach pain, nausea, vomiting, tremors, fatigue, anxiety, foggy thinking, and insomnia.
  • Stage 2: Peak Symptoms. The second phase of withdrawal involves symptoms peaking and lasts 2-4 days. Symptoms include increased heart rate, increased blood pressure, body temperature, and respiratory rate, mental confusion, sweating, mood swings, and irritability. Also, it is during this stage that delirium tremens (DTs) can develop, causing hallucinations, severe mental confusion, fever, and seizures.
  • Stage 3: Subsiding Symptoms. The final stage begins after day four and can persist for a couple of days to weeks. This stage is marked by depression, anxiety, confusion, insomnia, and cravings.

Keep in mind that throughout the detox process, your symptoms will be closely monitored and medications provided to minimize discomfort.

After Detox, What Comes Next?

Once you have completed the detox process, you are ready to enroll in the rehab portion of the recovery. Treatment is multi-pronged, with each activity building on the other to effect real change. Here is what you can expect in the rehab program:

  • Psychotherapy. Therapy is the main treatment element for alcohol recovery. Through therapy, you will examine any unhealthy behavior patterns that only perpetuate the alcohol addiction. Using CBT, the therapist guides you to reshape those thoughts and behaviors.
  • Family therapy. Family groups help the whole family unit heal and move forward together as their loved one enters recovery.
  • Education. Learning about the impact of alcohol on brain chemistry can be a deterrent to relapse. You will also be learning new coping tools and making a relapse prevention plan.
  • 12-step or similar. Peer support is a key element in recovery, and these meetings provide the opportunity to share experiences, challenges, fears, and goals with others in recovery.
  • Holistic. Rounding out rehabilitation are several activities that augment psychotherapy, including mindfulness training, yoga, art therapy, acupuncture, recreational therapy, equine therapy, and other activities that teach individuals relaxation techniques
  • Recreational therapy. Golf can be a very therapeutic addition to the rehab process. Spending time outdoors and getting exercise helps improve your mood and mindset.

Golf Drug Rehab Helps You Overcome Alcoholism

Golf Drug Rehab is a full-spectrum addiction treatment program that blends golf into the mix. If you are ready to that the first step in alcoholism recovery, give our team a call at (877) 958-5320.

cocaine drip

Cocaine drip is the presence of a constantly runny nose after using the drug. Cocaine drip can also occur in the back of the throat. To learn more about the adverse effects of cocaine use, read on.

Facts About Cocaine

Cocaine is a stimulant drug that is derived from the coca plant. It remains a popular drug due to its powerful euphoric effects. Cocaine causes the nerve activity in the central nervous system to speed up. This leads to a short-lived high that increases energy heightens focus, suppresses appetite, and enhances confidence.

As a DEA Schedule II substance, cocaine has a high potential for abuse and addiction. In fact, addiction can develop quickly. The drug is used in various ways, including snorting the powder through the nose. Cocaine can damage the delicate nasal tissues, as well as lead to a condition referred to as cocaine drip.

What is Cocaine Drip?

Because cocaine acts as a vasoconstrictor it has the effect of shrinking the blood vessels in the nose on contact. This causes the tissues to swell and mucous production to increase. The result is something called rhinitis, or a constant nasal drip. This is referred to as cocaine drip, coke drip, or simply the drip.

The other way that cocaine drip manifests itself is as a post-nasal drip. Once the drug has been snorted into the nasal cavity it will drip into the sinuses and the throat. This is experienced as a dripping sensation at the back of the throat and even onto the vocal chords.

Can Cocaine Drip be Treated?

There is only one way to cure drug-induced rhinitis and that is by stopping cocaine use. Once the mucous membranes that line the nose have had a chance to heal, the drip will cease. Meanwhile, there are some nasal saline sprays, as well as antihistamines or corticosteroids that may help with symptoms.

Other Ways Cocaine Affects Nasal Tissues

The phrase, cocaine nose (coke nose), pertains to the damaged condition of nasal tissues caused by cocaine use. The damage to the nose can be profound. When cocaine is used for an extended period it keeps the blood vessels in the nose constricted. The decreased circulation reduces the blood supply to the nose, causing damage.

As prolonged cocaine use takes a toll on the nose, the following damage can occur. These effects include:

  • The lining of the nose is more fragile, which can result in injuries and nosebleeds.
  • Severe sinus infections.
  • Septum damage.
  • The collapse of cartilage at the bridge of the nose.
  • Hard palate damage.

Long-term cocaine use can result in damage to the nose that is so severe a complete reconstruction or prosthetic nose is required.

Signs of Cocaine Addiction

As cocaine addiction sets in, there will be some clear signals. These signs and symptoms involve all areas of functioning, such as:

  1. Personality changes. Someone with a cocaine problem may begin to display paranoid behavior, anxiety attacks, depression, erratic behavior, and anger. When they are not high on coke, their mood may be flat or unresponsive. Stealing money to support the cocaine habit is also common among addicts.
  2. Intense mood swings. In the early phases of cocaine use, it is common for the person to be in a state of euphoria. They may be full of energy and very productive, and able to put in long hours. As tolerance increases and more of the drug is needed to maintain this energy, their mood becomes dark.
  3. The decline in work performance. In the early days of cocaine use, the person may be highly productive and have boundless energy. Later on, work performance begins to suffer. They miss work often or arrive late. They may struggle to concentrate or focus on the work, and they lose interest in the job.
  4. Physical symptoms. Coke addiction shows up with sudden weight loss, bloodshot eyes, dilated pupils, cocaine drip, muscle tics, and nose bleeds.  Cocaine addicts also commonly suffer from insomnia.
  • Money problems. Cocaine is a pricey drug that can quickly destroy personal finances. Bills go unpaid, credit cards are maxed out, savings accounts are depleted, and jobs are lost due to coke addiction.

Getting Help for a Cocaine Addiction

While the best way to stop the damage caused by cocaine is to discontinue using the drug, it is not always so easy. Cocaine has a powerful grip on the brain’s reward system. The best way to break that connection is to enroll in an evidence-based treatment program.

Treatment for cocaine addiction includes these elements:

  • Detox. The detox and withdrawal process must be completed prior to treatment. Withdrawal symptoms will range from mild to severe, depending on the scope of the cocaine addiction.
  • Talk therapy. A licensed therapist can help the person confront issues that may be providing fuel for the cocaine addiction. CBT and DBT are the most common evidence-based therapies to help break compulsive behaviors.
  • Group therapy. Small groups composed of peers in recovery will meet and discuss topics that pertain to recovery.
  • 12-step program. N.A. or A.A. themes are often woven into the treatment program.
  • Life skills training. Classes teach new coping skills that can help support recovery efforts. One of these is making a relapse prevention plan that is tailored for your specific needs.
  • Holistic. During rehab, you will learn to control stress by engaging in holistic activities. These include yoga classes, art therapy, mindfulness, and massage.
  • Recreation. Spending some time outdoors being active is very good for your mood state during treatment. Golf can provide a respite from the work of recovery.

If you are tired of a constant cocaine drip, reach out for treatment today.

Golf Drug Rehab Offers Upscale Cocaine Addiction Treatment

Golf Drug Rehab is a luxury addiction treatment center that offers golf alongside rehab. If you are struggling with a cocaine problem, our team is here to help. Give us a call today at (877) 958-5320.

addictive medications

Over the last decade, people have become much more aware of the dangers of addictive medications. Learn about these drugs and the signs of addiction to prescription pills.

As grateful as we are for relief from what ails us, the truth is that some medications are very addictive. While drugs can provide pain relief, or help to manage anxiety or other issues, for some people, they are dangerous.

Each person has a unique metabolism and genetic make-up. Medications can lead to addiction in some of us, and therefore must be used with care. But some people abuse these prescription drugs in search of a high. This can be especially risky, and even result in an overdose or death.

By being aware of the dangers of pills, you can provide yourself with information that helps you avoid these risks. Read on to learn more about addictive meds.

How Medications Lead to Addiction

When a doctor prescribes pain medication after surgery or an injury, you would not think it could become a problem. For most people, taking pain meds for a short period isn’t an issue. For others, though, it can impact the brain’s reward system. When the reward center of the brain records a sensation as pleasurable, it sets up the desire to repeat it. That is the basis for an addiction to slowly take hold.

There are many risks involved in pill addiction. As the tolerance ramps up, the person will take ever-higher doses of the medication to chase that high. Meanwhile, the brain pathways are being altered in response to the dopamine that is produced. In as little as a few weeks of dosing, some people will acquire an addiction. By taking higher doses the person risks an overdose.

Addiction itself is very risky, with adverse impacts to all areas of someone’s life. But when the pills are no longer available, the person may switch to heroin, or buy the pills online. This can put the person at much higher risk of a fentanyl overdose. This is due to the many fake pills on the street that contain the deadly drug.

Pills that are Highly Addictive

It isn’t only opioids that are addictive. There are many types of meds that can cause someone to become addicted. This happens when the person comes to believe that they cannot function without the pills. They begin to be obsessed about getting and taking these meds.

Types of drugs that are highly addiction include:

  • Opioids. These include such drugs as Vicodin, Oxy, Dilaudid, Percocet, and Norco.
  • Benzos. These include Xanax, Ativan, Klonopin, Valium, and Librium.
  • Stimulants. These include Adderall, Ritalin, and Vyvanse.
  • Barbiturates. These include Nembutal, Seconal, and Mebaral.

Signs of a Pill Addiction

The signs of addiction are similar, no matter which drug is involved. The only noticeable difference are the withdrawal symptoms, as these vary depending on the substance.

Signs of addiction may include:

  • Become obsessed with obtaining and taking the pills.
  • Increased tolerance, leading to higher dosing.
  • Doctor shopping; buying pills on the street or online.
  • Having mood swings.
  • Changes in eating and/or sleeping habits.
  • Weight gain or loss.
  • Become irresponsible; engage in high-risk actions.
  • Irritability
  • Withdraw from friends and family.
  • Keep taking the meds despite the negative impact on life.
  • Stealing pills from friends or family members.
  • Having withdrawal symptoms when drug wears off

These are warning signs that you or someone you know has developed a problem with a prescription drug. The sooner the person seeks treatment, the better the outcome. The first step is to safely complete the detox process.

What to Expect in Detox

Once someone decides they are ready to break free from a pill addiction they must complete detox and withdrawal. This is not to be taken lightly, as certain drugs shouldn’t be stopped with a doctor’s guidance. To quit the drug abruptly will trigger very harsh and sometimes life threatening symptoms.

To avoid this outcome, a medical detox program is advised. A doctor creates a special tapering plan that slowly wears the person off the drug. By using this type of taper schedule, the system slowly adjusts to the lower doses. This can help reduce the discomfort and risks of the detox process.

The withdrawal symptoms will be different based on the drug group:

OPIOIDS:

  • Muscle pain
  • Nausea and vomiting
  • Diarrhea
  • Sweating
  • Restlessness
  • Dilated pupils
  • Anxiety
  • Excessive yawning
  • Insomnia
  • Chills or goosebumps

BENZOS:

  • Anxiety
  • Hyperventilation
  • Insomnia
  • Sweating
  • Racing pulse
  • Nausea or vomiting
  • Muscle spasms
  • Restlessness

STIMULANTS:

  • Depression
  • Irritability
  • Mood swings
  • Insomnia
  • Stomach cramping
  • Vomiting
  • Fatigue

Due to most drug detoxes causing mental health symptoms too, the detox team also provides counseling and support.

Treatment Options for Pill Addiction

After detox is done, the next is to embark on the next phase of recovery—rehab treatment. It is through treatment that the person learns how to change the entrenched addictive behaviors.

Depending on the type of pill addiction, the program also helps the person manage the medical issue without the need for the pills. For chronic pain, they will learn new holistic methods for pain control. If the problem is related to stress, they will learn natural ways to relax.

There are two main settings for addiction treatment, an outpatient program or a residential program. Both types of rehab settings use the same basic treatment interventions. These include:

  • One-on-one therapy sessions. Therapy helps teach new ways of thinking and reacting to stress or other triggers. This is done mainly through CBT and DBT techniques.
  • Group therapy sessions. These sessions have a licensed counselor leading the peer group in talks that revolve around recovery.
  • 12-step meetings. The 12- step program is often a part of the treatment program. This may also include 12-step meetings that the clients all join.
  • Education. Clients learn new coping skills and practice them.
  • Relapse prevention. Clients make their own plans to avoid relapsing after they leave rehab.
  • Stress reduction. Learning new ways to relax, such as yoga, meditation, and massage, are skills that will help in recovery.

With so many addictive medications on the market, it is not a surprise that we might find ourselves struggling with an addiction. With the guidance and support of an evidence-based treatment program, you can overcome a problem with an addictive medication.

Golf Drug Rehab Provides Luxury Addiction Treatment

Golf Drug Rehab is an upscale drug and alcohol treatment center for the golf lover. If you or someone you care about has developed a problem with pills, give our team a call today at (877) 958-5320.

how does meth affect the body

It may be shocking to learn the many ways that meth affects the body. This potent and destructive substance can wreak havoc on both physical and mental health. Read on to learn more about how meth affects the body.

What is Methamphetamine?

Methamphetamine (meth) is an illicit stimulant drug concocted with amphetamine and a variety of flammable household ingredients. These may include battery acid, drain cleaner, or paint thinner, all products that can cause an altered state of reality.

Meth is a potent and dangerous stimulant that can cause profound changes in the brain. Even after a single use, the brain’s reward pathways can be affected, leading the person to seek the drug again. After ongoing use, the brain begins to depend on the drug to stabilize the altered brain and provide dopamine.

The initial effects of meth include sensations of euphoria, alertness, energy, and a sense of wellbeing. However, there are also some adverse effects caused by meth use. These include:

  • Shortness of breath.
  • Hyperactivity, mania.
  • Tremors
  • Vomiting
  • Decreased appetite and weight loss.
  • Diarrhea
  • Insomnia

Meth is also referred to as crystal meth, speed, crystal, ice, and crank. The drug can be ingested in various ways, such as smoked, swallowed in pill form, snorted, or injected. The drug’s effects come on quickly and fade fairly fast, leading to continued abuse and eventually addiction.

Meth Addiction

Once someone becomes addicted to meth they will be unable to control their drug-seeking behaviors and meth use. This happens when the brain’s chemical makeup has been altered and natural dopamine production dwindles. Without the drug, the person no longer feels pleasure.

As addiction sets in, the person’s life will begin to unravel. Legal problems, job losses, stress, financial problems, child custody issues, and even homelessness are common among meth addicts.

Some of the signs of active meth addiction include:

  • Severe dental disease.
  • Skin sores from picking at invisible bugs.
  • Weight loss.
  • Droopy skin.
  • Insomnia
  • Angry or violent outbursts
  • Cognitive problems.
  • Aggressive behavior; angry outbursts.
  • Mental confusion.
  • Mood swings.
  • Depression
  • Anxiety
  • Paranoia
  • Psychosis

How Meth Affects the Body

Because meth is such a toxic substance, serious health conditions can develop as a result of addiction. The drug inflicts heavy damage to the body. Some of the effects of long-term meth abuse include:

  • Meth mouth.
  • Memory loss.
  • Increased risk of stroke
  • Hypertension.
  • Coronary artery disease
  • Cardiac arrest
  • Aortic dissection
  • Parkinson’s disease
  • Liver damage; increased risk of hep B and hep C
  • Increased risk of HIV/AIDS

Although some of the damage done to the brain and the body can be reversed, many will suffer long-term health effects even in recovery. Other long-term effects of recovery include feeling chronically tired and depressed.

What is Meth Mouth?

One of the most extreme effects of meth is a dental condition called “meth mouth.” The level of damage to the teeth will depend upon the duration and extent of the meth addiction. Meth mouth is often seen in heavy meth users, not those who use it on occasion. Meth mouth is more severe in women versus men.

Meth mouse is caused by dry mouth, a direct result of the meth addiction. Meth users may also grind their teeth, causing teeth to loosen or crack. It is also common for meth addicts to lose interest in taking care of their dental hygiene.

Signs and symptoms of meth mouth may include:

  • Poor overall dental health.
  • Loose teeth.
  • Sensitive teeth.
  • Inflamed gums.
  • Dry mouth and tongue.
  • Broken or fractured teeth.
  • Severe tooth decay.
  • Loss of teeth.

In many cases, the person waits too long before seeking the help of a dentist. By the time they reach out for help the damage is too extensive and the teeth can’t be saved. This often results in full mouth extractions and dentures.

Meth Detox and Withdrawal

Before you can break a meth habit, you will need to first complete the detox and withdrawal process. This is best done under the care of a detox team who will be able to assist you as symptoms arise. They have various meds they can use to help reduce discomfort.

Because meth is a synthetic drug, the withdrawal effects are more intense and ragged. The human body is not equipped to metabolize the dangerous and toxic ingredients contained in meth.

The withdrawal symptoms emerge within 12 hours of the last dosing. This is called the “meth comedown,” which refers to the period when the drug is wearing off. The person may experience the following symptoms:

  • Lethargy
  • Increased appetite.
  • Paranoia
  • Mental confusion.
  • Anxiety
  • Sleep disturbance.
  • Irritability
  • Agitation
  • Mood swings.
  • Intense depression.
  • Drug cravings.
  • Memory problems.
  • Thoughts of self-harm or suicide.

During meth withdrawal, the psychological symptoms are often worse than the physical symptoms. This is an added reason to only attempt meth detox under supervision, as there is a heightened risk of suicide.

Turn Your Life Around with Treatment and Recovery

Making the decision to get clean and sober after a meth addiction should come with the knowledge that you will need ongoing support. Starting with a structured treatment program, you will be guided toward learning ways to deflect compulsive drug seeking behaviors. Using one-on-one therapy, group therapy, 12-step groups, and addiction education, these programs can help you turn your life around.

Life is too short and too precious to waste it with a meth problem. Seeing how meth can affect the body may be a wake-up call for many. These are the long-term effects that people are largely unaware of when they take that first hit of meth. But now that you know meth’s affect on the body and you are ready to break free from its grip, reach out for help today.

Golf Drug Rehab Provides Luxury Meth Addiction Recovery Services

Golf Drug Rehab is an upscale addiction treatment center that offers help for those who struggle with meth. Our program features an evidence-based treatment approach combined with recreational golf. By mixing in some pleasure with the work of rehab, there is a greater chance you will complete the program. For more details, call us today at (877) 958-5320.

signs that alcohol is killing you

Notice the Dangers of Alcohol Before it’s Too Late

Too much of anything, no matter how much pleasure it brings, can lead to harmful effects. Take anything you might enjoy—eating chocolate, shopping, playing blackjack, even working. Any of these could cause harm if it is overdone.

The adverse effects of overindulgence are well known. This can cause obesity, bankruptcy, harm to the body, mental distress, and more. The same can be said about alcohol. An occasional drink is not a problem. But if drinking takes on a major role in your life, the effects can be very harmful.

Alcoholism is a widespread problem in the U.S., with 88,000 deaths each year attributed to alcohol. Ethyl alcohol is a highly toxic substance that can cause extreme damage to someone’s life. A drinking problem can harm you both physically and psychologically. Not only yourself but others if they are hurt or killed due to drunk driving.

For many, the harmful effects of heavy drinking may not be clear for some time. But at some point, it will become obvious that alcohol is killing you.

Heavy Alcohol Consumption Defined

The CDC has set guidelines that help people to be aware of what constitutes heavy drinking. According to the CDC:

  • Excessive drinking: 8 or more drinks in a week for women; 15 or more drinks in a week for men.
  • Binge drinking:  4 or more drinks in a single session for women; 5 or more drinks in a single session for men.
  • A “drink”:  A 12-ounce beer, 8 ounces of malt liquor, 5 ounces or wine, or 1½ ounces of liquor.

5 Signs Alcohol is Killing You

It is mind boggling just how hard alcohol is on the brain and body. The signs alcohol is killing you may creep up slowly, with a symptom here or there. Or it may hit you all at once with a liver that has ceased to function, as in late stage alcoholism. Here are 5 signs that alcohol is killing you:

  1. Cardiac symptoms. Long-term heavy drinking takes a toll on the heart. A sign of a serious cardiac issue that could result in death is a heart arrhythmia, another term for abnormal heart rate. Alcohol can also cause alcoholic cardiomyopathy. This is when the heart muscle weakens and cannot pump enough blood to the organs. This can result in organ damage or heart failure.
  2. Cognitive problems. Excessive alcohol use can lead to brain damage, which shows up first when cognitive function is reduced. Memory problems are another sign. Thiamine (B1) deficiency often results, leading to brain damage.
  3. Gastrointestinal problems. Heavy drinking can cause excess stomach acid, such as acid reflux which can lead to gastritis. It also causes problems in the stomach lining, such as ulcers and bleeding. The loss of blood can lead to anemia, causing extreme fatigue.
  4. Liver disease. Alcohol is highly toxic to the liver. The problem with liver disease is that the signs of it may not be noticed until later stages. This happens with cirrhosis. It often begins as fatty liver disease. It is a fatal condition unless a liver transplant succeeds.
  5. Cancer symptoms. Excess drinking causes an increased risk of many types of cancer, most of them deadly. Types of cancer linked with heavy drinking include oral, throat, esophageal, colon, rectal, pancreatic, liver, and breast cancer.

In addition to these health effects of alcoholism, other very bad consequences can be caused in other ways. These include legal problems due to DUIs, loss of a job, divorce, custody battles, and money problems.

Detox and Withdrawal

The first step in recovery will involve detox. Withdrawal symptoms range from mild to severe depending on factors like drinking history, age, health, and mental health.

The detox timeline is fairly consistent. What is not so easy to predict is acute alcohol withdrawal syndrome or the DTs. This health emergency emerges on days 3-4 in about 5% of those going through detox. But of those who it affects, there is a 15% death rate.

Detox Timeline:

Stage 1: Symptoms commence 6-12 hours after the last drink. This early phase lasts only one day and includes such symptoms as hand tremors, headaches, and nausea.

Stage 2: Symptoms peak during this phase, which begins on day 2 and usually lasts two days. This stage includes such symptoms as vomiting, sweating, confusion, fever, irritability, mood swings, heart palpitations, anxiety, and insomnia. Those with a more severe alcohol problems may also have hallucinations, mental confusion, and high blood pressure. There is also a risk of seizure.

Stage 3: The final two days will see the symptoms subside as the brain becomes stable. While the intense symptoms start to decrease, some still feel the psychological effects. These include depression, anxiety, irritability, and insomnia.

Comprehensive Treatment for Alcoholism Recovery

After the detox is complete, the individual will be stable enough to begin treatment. Treating alcoholism relies on a group of therapies that are designed to work in tandem. Treatment helps them change toxic behaviors and equips them with new coping skills.

These rehab elements include:

Psychotherapy: Therapy is at the heart of treatment. Using evidence-based theories such as CBT, DBT, and motivation enhancement clients learn new thoughts and behavior patterns. Therapists will work with clients to assist them in changing thought distortions that have led to the drinking problem.

Group work: Group therapy allows clients to share about the events in their lives that have led to the problem of drinking. These peer support groups provide a safe place to help each other while in rehab.

12-step program: A.A.’s 12-step program is often added to the treatment plan, but not always. There are non 12-step recovery programs available as well, and some rehabs offer both types of meetings.

Recreation therapy: Restoring health after alcoholism is a key focus during rehab and beyond. Nutritional counseling and outdoor fitness provide ways to improve brain health and wellness.

Holistic activities: To learn how to reduce stress is key in recovery. Many rehabs today offer holistic activities that teach clients how to relax. These might include yoga classes, massage, guided meditation, art or music therapy, and mindfulness training.

Golf Drug Rehab Provides Effective Treatment for Alcoholism

Golf Drug Rehab is a unique rehab program located in South Orange County. Using a blend of evidence-based therapies and golf recreational therapy, clients balance recovery work and enjoyable pastimes. For any questions about the program, please connect with Golf Drug Rehab today at [phone_number].

sober golf

Rehabilitation from drug or alcohol addiction is serious business. The process of detoxing the body from the presence of chemicals and toxins is not for the faint of heart. The active treatment portion of addiction recovery involves layers of multi-modal therapies that require focus, effort, and commitment for a sustained period of weeks or months. This is why sprinkling in a dose of recreational therapy in the form of sober golf is so welcome to those facing down the rehab process.

You remember in the movie, The Shining, Jack Nicholson’s character typed over and over “All work and no play makes Jack a dull boy.” Well, there is truth to his maniacal rant—hard work should indeed be balanced with some play. It is important to mix in some recreation during the time spent restoring mental and physical health, and addiction rehab with sober golf is a perfect pairing.

Sober golf is exactly what it says, playing golf without drinking or using drugs. It means enjoying the game in the purest, most natural way possible, fully alert and focused while getting sunshine and exercise in the process. Being outdoors on the course instantly lifts one’s mood, and the camaraderie at the heart of the game adds a positive dose of peer support in recovery.

How Addiction Rehab With Sober Golf Elevates the Rehab Experience

Let’s face it—no one looks forward to entering a drug or alcohol treatment program. That is plain fact. The experience is anxiety-provoking and difficult under even the best conditions. There is no bullet train to achieving sobriety; recovery is a long slog that will try your patience for years to come. But, as they say, the best things in life are worth fighting for, and when it comes to breaking free from the grip of addiction, it is life itself that is the ultimate prize.

So, that said, how can playing golf elevate the grind of the rehab experience? There is a multitude of ways that adding golf to the rehab menu will make the whole process more palatable. These include:

  • Recreational activities provide an opportunity to decompress from the serious work of therapy
  • Golf gives the client something enjoyable to look forward to during the rehab experience
  • Golf gets you outdoors, moving, smiling, chatting, and is a nice distraction from therapy
  • Golf provides an opportunity to build new friendships built on a mutual desire for sobriety

The Importance of Organized Recreation in Rehab

Recreational therapies such as golf can provide both physical and psychological benefits. In fact, the National Council for Therapeutic Recreation Certification defines recreational therapy as a systematic process that utilizes recreation and other activity-based interventions as a means to psychological and physical recovery and well-being. Therapeutic recreation can enhance mood, build confidence, and provide important opportunities to socialize. In addition, organized recreational activities, such as golf, are known to reduce stress and enhance relaxation, both important to addiction recovery.

Physical activity in rehab can help the brain as its chemistry rebalances and neurotransmitter production is normalized. This can have a protective effect against relapse, acting as a natural mood stabilizer. During rehab, clients can be still unstable as brain chemistry is rebounding to normal levels, so adding in recreational activities can help the process along.

How Addiction Rehab with Sober Golf Benefits the Newly Sober

Going to rehab can be depressing and may create a lot of stress for the client. Knowing that they will have to be away from work and their family for an extended period of time causes anxiety, as does the unknown of the rehab experience itself. Anticipating a lengthy period away from what is familiar to them, as well as preparing to give up their substance of choice, is indeed stressful.

By offering regular access to golf, the rehab entices the client into a more positive frame of mind that can enhance the effectiveness of the treatment. Clients who are positive and forward-thinking tend to have better recovery outcomes. They don’t look at rehab in a negative light, but as a means to an end—a healthy, sober lifestyle. For many people, golf is a passion. These folks thrive on the golf course, enjoying the challenges that a course throws at them and enjoying the company of friends while trying to successfully navigate the course. Sober golf only amplifies that positive experience by removing the inebriation and replacing it with the clear-headed engagement in the activity itself.

What to Expect in Addiction Treatment

While golf can compliment a rehab program and add some fun to the program, the foundational function of the rehab is to teach people how to not reach for the substance they have programmed their brains to crave. This is the serious part of the recovery process, the re-training of the mind and resulting behavioral responses. This brain reprogramming will take time, effort, and lots of patience.

In addiction treatment, you can expect to live a very structured existence for the duration of the program. There is a reason for this, and that is to help stabilize the client in early recovery, offering predictability, normal healthy routines, and constant engagement during each day. Generally, a treatment program will offer several different but complementary treatment elements. These typically include:

  • Psychotherapy sessions
  • Group therapy sessions
  • Classes that teach about how addiction develops
  • Relapse prevention planning
  • Motivational or informative guest speakers
  • Medication management
  • Experiential therapies, including recreational activities, yoga, meditation, mindfulness training, art therapy, acupuncture, journaling, and massage therapy

Golf Drug Rehab Offers Addiction Rehab With Sober Golf

Golf Drug Rehab is an upscale drug and alcohol addiction treatment program serving Orange County, California. Situated in a beautiful and serene coastal setting, Golf Drug Rehab provides an exclusive treatment experience that includes access to three premium golf courses in the local vicinity. The perfect combination of supervised detox, highly effective therapies, sober golf and other spa-like amenities allows clients to heal and regain their sense of self-worth. For more information about the program, please contact Golf Drug Rehab today at [phone_number]

Exercise and Addiction Recovery

If you are in early recovery for a drug or alcohol addiction chances are your body has seen better days. In active addiction, most people pay little attention to nutrition and exercise, leading to eventual vitamin deficiencies, a depleted immune system, and a paunchy physique as time and energy were diverted toward acquiring, using, and recovering from the drug of choice. Once the mind clears in sobriety and you begin to focus on the consequences of the addiction, you may be startled at the poor state of your physical health.

Thankfully, the body is resilient and, with some consistency and dedication to overall wellness, it can rebound. Making fitness a priority can provide a multitude of benefits for the individual in recovery. Exercise and addiction recovery is an excellent combination for renewing strength, confidence, and hope in achieving a fulfilling life.

Exercise and Addiction Recovery: The Protective Effects of Physical Activity

While it has been widely understood in the recovery field for years that exercise is beneficial to individuals in addiction recovery, there is actual research that helps indicate how and why that is. In an article by Mark A. Smith and Wendy J. Lynch published in Frontiers in Psychology entitled “Exercise as a Potential Treatment for Drug Abuse: Evidence from Preclinical Studies,” the authors explain how epidemiological studies, or how certain determinants can influence disease development or progression, demonstrate the protective effects of exercise for the recovering addict. The article states that “Collectively, these studies have provided convincing evidence to support the development of exercise-based interventions to reduce compulsive patterns of drug intake in clinical and at-risk populations.”

In their study featuring rats who had access to a running wheel in the home cage, they found that the effects of running lasted beyond the exercise period, reducing the rats drug-seeking behavior after a period of abstinence. This, they posit, demonstrates how exercise may be effective at preventing relapse. They conclude by stating that the neurobiological effects of exercise can serve as an alternative non-drug reinforcer of sobriety.

How Early in Recovery Should Exercise Begin?

Considering the multiple realms that exercise and addiction recovery seem to work in tandem for positive outcomes, there is no reason to delay integrating regular physical activity into the recovery process. Starting in rehab, where most programs provide recreational activities or a gym, the individual can begin the process of restoring physical health while enjoying the psychological benefits of exercise.

Cardio-based activities such as walking, jogging, cycling, dance fitness, running, and swimming are excellent options to include in the recovery routine. Cardio or aerobic, exercise involves the pumping of oxygenated blood by the heart, delivering it to the working muscles. This works the lungs, heart, and muscles simultaneously, providing many health benefits.

5 Benefits of Exercise in Recovery

When you set aside a certain amount of time each week for physical activity you are sending a subliminal message to yourself that you care about your health and wellbeing. As the results of regular exercise start to become apparent, it will inspire you to continue on this positive, healthy trajectory in recovery. The primary benefits of combining exercise and addiction recovery include:

  1. Decreases stress while increasing resilience to stress. Stress is the number one foe of someone in early recovery, having the potential to induce a relapse. Regular physical activity will improve circulation and release brain chemicals leading to stress reduction. Over time, pushing oneself physically can create stronger mental stamina over stressful situations.
  2. Improves overall mood. It will take time to correct brain chemistry so that it will begin producing dopamine naturally again. Meanwhile, exercise is known to cause a release of endorphins and serotonin, boosting mood naturally.
  3. Boosts confidence. The sense of accomplishment that you get from completing a task, even a round of golf or a brisk walk, can help boost confidence in yourself. As you get stronger and begin to feel better, you slowly build up a renewed sense of self-worth.
  4. Promotes physical health. Just getting outside and moving your body can begin the process of restoring health. Regular exercise has enormous positive effects on all bodily systems, improving heart health, stamina, energy level, muscle strength, joint mobility, and increased immune response.
  5. Improves sleep quality. Regular physical activity helps to regulate body temperature, reduce stress, and promote relaxation, all beneficial to getting quality sleep. The energy expended in exercise can translate to getting more hours of sleep as well.

Golf Drug Rehab Incorporates Golf and Fitness Into Addiction Recovery Program

Golf Drug Rehab is a luxury rehabilitation center located in Orange County, California. As implied in the name of the program, Golf Drug Rehab places an emphasis on the fitness component of recovery, offering access to three deluxe golf courses in the local vicinity for its clients. Golf Drug Rehab combines outdoor activity with a powerful arsenal of proven evidence-based therapies for excellent recovery results. For more information about how the program meshes exercise and addiction recovery, please contact Golf Drug Rehab today at [phone_number]

Am I an Alcoholic

Alcohol abuse, alcohol addiction, alcohol dependency—with so many terms referencing an alcohol use disorder it may make the actual definition of alcoholism seem murky and confusing.  In reality, alcoholism is a complex substance use disorder with various features that help define the severity of the problem, or whether the alcohol use, although excessive, even reaches the clinical definition of the disease.

According to the definition of alcoholism by the Merriam-Webster dictionary, alcoholism is:

  1. Continued excessive or compulsive use of alcoholic drinks
  2. a.  Chronic, progressive, potentially fatal disorder marked by excessive and usually compulsive drinking leading to psychological and physical dependence or addiction
  3.  Acute alcohol poisoning resulting from the usually rapid consumption of excessive alcoholic beverages

Well, this serves as a starting point in understanding the nuances of alcoholism, but still allows for different interpretations of what exactly constitutes alcoholism.  If you are asking yourself “Am I an alcoholic” or “Do I need addiction treatment” then this blog may offer some helpful information.

What Exactly is Alcoholism?

It is difficult to know whether someone is an alcoholic or just

a problem drinker.  Some people can abuse alcohol for years without developing alcohol dependence. Others may be high-functioning alcoholics, able to be successful at a career and fulfilling family obligations even though they consume high amounts of alcohol.  Eventually, however, abusing alcohol for an extended time period will take a toll one way or another. Health will be impacted, cognitive decline occurs, or there might be a DUI arrest that creates legal headaches—even if the individual never became alcoholic in the classical sense.

Risk Factors For Alcoholism

So why is it that some heavy drinkers become alcoholics and others do not?  There are some risk factors for alcoholism that can predispose an individual to become an alcoholic.  The genetic component is one such factor. If someone has a strong family history of alcoholism there is a much higher probability that they could also become an alcoholic.  A co-occurring mental health disorder, such as depression, bipolar disorder, or generalized anxiety can also result in alcohol dependence, as the individual seeks to numb emotional pain or symptoms of anxiety.

A series of difficult life events, such as losing a loved one, divorce, losing a job, or experiencing or witnessing trauma can all contribute to depending on alcohol to soothe the emotional symptoms that are experienced as a result of the negative events.  

So, Am I an Alcoholic?

There are behavioral symptoms that an addiction is forming that can serve as warning signs.  These might include:

  • Obsessing over when you can drink next or how to obtain the alcohol
  • Trying to quit drinking and cannot
  • Withdrawing from friends and family
  • Loss of interest in the activities once enjoyed
  • Drinking more and more alcohol as tolerance increases
  • Mood swings
  • Losing interest in maintaining personal appearance and hygiene
  • Irritability
  • Concentration problems
  • Sleep disturbances
  • Alcohol cravings
  • When an attempt to quit drinking withdrawal symptoms emerge

10 Signs that Help Answer the Question, “Am I an Alcoholic?”

There are some universal signs that someone has crossed into alcoholism.  The National Council on Alcoholism and Drug Dependence (NCADD) has an online questionnaire that can help you determine if you have a problem with alcohol.  Among the points the NCADD includes are:

  1. You avoid friends and family while drinking
  2. You consume higher quantities of alcohol as time goes on
  3. You drink in response to stress, sadness, anger, or disappointment
  4. You have hand tremors in the morning
  5. You cannot remember things you said or did the night before
  6. You are experiencing financial, legal, career, or family problems due to drinking
  7. Your doctor advised you to cut down on alcohol
  8. You lie about how much alcohol you drink
  9. You are preoccupied during the day with drinking or crave alcohol
  10. You get drunk several days in a row

Treatment for Alcoholism

Getting treatment for an alcohol use disorder is life changing.  After completing detox, you will enter into an extended period of active treatment during which you will immerse yourself in a variety of therapeutic activities that all work together to help you overcome the alcoholism.  This will include individual talk therapy with a clinical psychotherapist who will guide you in examining any past traumas or emotional pain that might be driving the need to drink. Group therapy sessions allow a peer support system to develop where clients can help each other and share experiences.  Medications, such as naltrexone, can be used for the early phase of recovery to help reduce alcohol cravings. Recreational therapies, such as yoga, hiking, exercise sessions, golf, tennis, or surfing can take some pressure off and infuse some social activities during treatment.

Golf Drug Rehab Provides Superior Alcohol Use Disorder Treatment in Southern California

Golf Drug Rehab is a luxury drug and alcohol addiction treatment program in California.  The expert and compassionate clinical staff at Golf Drug Rehab is highly trained in detox and addiction treatment for individuals in need of help for an alcohol use disorder.  Offering the very latest treatment modalities and three amazing golf courses to help clients enjoy some recreational therapy, Golf Drug Rehab provides the perfect blend of therapy and golf.  If you are wondering “Am I an alcoholic?” or have questions about our program, call Golf Drug Rehab today at [phone_number].

detox centers

As wonderful as it may seem to spend a week relaxing at a luxury detox center, especially one that is located in a gorgeous, tranquil setting, the hard reality is that detox serves a serious, and potentially life-saving, purpose.  The high-end trappings do indeed make the detox mission more comfortable, for sure.

Private rooms, a variety of amenities, and plenty of oversight and personal attention can make the detoxification process at least palatable.  But most important, the upscale detox center will provide the supervision and care that will safely guide you through the detox and withdrawal stage of early addiction recovery and into an effective treatment program.

The Benefits of a Luxury Detox Centers

A luxury detox center integrates the same level of premium features that you would expect to find at a high-end spa or retreat.  Offering uncompromising luxury to its clients, these premier detoxification programs can truly make the detox experience go more smoothly.  Just knowing that your needs will be met and that you will be staying in luxurious quarters can be very comforting to prospective clients.

Some of the benefits of a luxury detox center include:

  • A more intimate setting.  Fewer clients mean they will receive a higher level of attention while progressing through the detox process.  With few clients, there is less crowding in common areas, making the experience more relaxing and less stressful, as well as offering more personalized care.
  • Location.  In most cases, private luxury detox programs are situated in highly desirable geographical settings, such as coastal communities, desert resort locales, or mountain retreats, offering a sense of serenity.
  • Amenities.  Luxury detox and treatment centers pay close attention to creature comforts, offering deluxe accommodations and plenty of spa-like services.  They may have a gourmet chef on staff or offer organic, locally-sourced cuisine.
  • Holistic therapies.  Many luxury detox centers feature relaxation-promoting experiential therapies, such as acupuncture, mindfulness meditation, and art therapy.

How Your Privacy is Protected in Detox

Stigma continues to be an unwelcome reality when it comes to someone getting professional help for a drug or alcohol addiction.  Many professionals in high-profile positions put off getting treatment due to the concern that their rehab stint might become known, which they fear could jeopardize their career.  Private luxury detox and addiction treatment programs are very committed to protecting the privacy and confidentiality of their clients.

In addition, there are laws that prohibit a rehab or detox center from releasing any patient records without the client’s written consent.  Reputable rehab programs vigilantly protect clients’ privacy and their dignity, prioritizing discretion at all times.

What to Expect in Detox

Detox provides additional safety measures that may not be offered at other types of detox facilities, and certainly not at home if the individual attempts to self-detox.  There is good reason for personnel to be available during drug or alcohol detoxification, as emergency events can suddenly emerge. A supervised detox offers the most supportive environment for the client as they process through detox and withdrawal, seeing to their needs throughout the phases of detox.

The degree of discomfort while going through detox will depend on the client’s addiction severity, age, their general state of physical health, whether they have a mental health disorder, and how long the addiction has been in place.  Different substances of abuse have different withdrawal symptoms, but in most cases, detox tends to progress through three stages:

Stage 1:  The first signs of withdrawal symptoms will commence between 6-12 hours after the last alcoholic drink or drug dosing.  Emerging symptoms will be unpleasant but not severe.

Stage 2:  Withdrawal symptoms tend to reach their peak at about days 2-3 of the process, during which the symptoms can be immensely uncomfortable or painful.  In addition, psychological symptoms, such as anxiety, depression, hallucinations, and psychosis can exacerbate this difficult stage of detox.

Stage 3:  From days 4-7 the majority of the withdrawal symptoms will begin to subside dramatically, as the body expels the toxins from the body.  Some symptoms will linger for weeks but are usually managed by medications.

During the duration of the detox, interventions will be introduced by the detox team that can dramatically reduce the discomfort of the withdrawal symptoms.  The goal of the detox professionals is to provide the maximum level of comfort possible in order to guide the client through the detox phase and into active treatment immediately following.

Golf Drug Rehab Offers Luxury Detox and a Private Setting

Golf Drug Rehab is a premier executive drug and alcohol treatment program in California that caters to the discerning individual who is accustomed to premium services.  An expert detox team will carefully monitor vital signs and withdrawal symptoms throughout the detox procedure. Our detox professionals will provide maximum comfort and emotional support during the detox and withdrawal process.  Following detox, Golf Drug Rehab offers a unique addiction treatment program that melds the most effective therapies and treatment modalities with high-end golf, providing access to three stellar golf courses to add some recreational therapy into the mix.  For more information about our program, please contact Golf Drug Rehab today at [phone_number].

Mild Alcohol Withdrawal

It is widely understood that people with an alcohol dependency who want to enter recovery should undergo a supervised detox. There is good reason for this guidance, as alcohol detox and withdrawal can produce highly unpredictable, even dangerous, symptoms. A detox is monitored by trained detox specialists who are prepared to intervene should such symptoms arise and cause an emergency. At the very least, a detox program is able to help reduce unpleasant symptoms and safely guide the individual to the other side and into treatment.

Not all withdrawal symptoms, however, are so severe. The severity of the withdrawal symptoms is correlated to the acuity of the alcohol dependency. Someone with a fairly recent alcohol use disorder or who hasn’t consistently consumed large amounts of alcohol will likely experience mild alcohol withdrawal symptoms. A detox is still the best route to starting the recovery journey, but expectations of horrendous withdrawals would be overblown in the case of a mild alcohol use disorder.

What Causes Alcohol Withdrawal Symptoms?

Withdrawing from alcohol can result in physical discomfort and pain, as the body tries to adjust to the cessation of alcohol consumption. This is caused by the impact of consistent alcohol consumption on the central nervous system and how that impacts neuropathways. When the alcohol intake suddenly stops, the decreased responsiveness of GABA receptors in the brain will incite withdrawal symptoms.

Only so much alcohol can be metabolized by the body, broken down by enzymes in the liver. The brain or other bodily tissues will absorb any excess alcohol. Over time, the increasing levels of toxins stored in the brain, as a result of excessive alcohol consumption, can cause the brain to suppress certain neurotransmitters, so when alcohol intake ceases, hyperexcitability of these brain chemicals results.

Factors that Influence the Severity of Alcohol Withdrawals

Certain factors dictate the level of the withdrawal symptoms, which can range from mild alcohol withdrawal symptoms to severe. These factors include:

  • How long the individual has had the alcohol use disorder
  • The level of alcohol consumed
  • History of alcohol withdrawal syndrome
  • Age of individual
  • General health status of individual

Co-occurring mental health disorders can also exacerbate some of the psychological symptoms experienced during withdrawal, such as anxiety and depression.

What is Alcohol Withdrawal Syndrome (AWS)?

The above factors are taken into consideration during the intake process to help gauge the level of alcohol withdrawal syndrome (AWS) that might occur. Acute AWS features severe withdrawal symptoms when alcohol use is abruptly stopped. Approximately 10% of individuals withdrawing from alcohol will experience alcohol withdrawal syndrome featuring acute symptoms. These acute withdrawal symptoms emerge approximately 2 to 4 days into the detox process and might include:

  • High blood pressure
  • Increased heart rate
  • Hallucinations
  • High fever
  • Excessive sweating
  • Insomnia
  • Seizures
  • Delirium Tremens

What is Considered Mild Alcohol Withdrawal Symptoms?

Not everyone who stops drinking will experience acute withdrawal symptoms. Some individuals might only experience sweating, hand tremors, nausea, sleep disturbance, and anxiety. Someone with a mild or recent alcohol use disorder should not avoid detox for fear of withdrawal symptoms, as these mild alcohol withdrawal symptoms are easily managed by the detox team. A sedative, such as Ativan, can help with both insomnia and anxiety, and simple over-the-counter interventions can help with fever, stomach distress, or headache.

Withdrawal symptoms begin to emerge about six hours after the last alcoholic drink. Symptoms peak on days 2 and 3 and then begin to subside. In most instances, alcohol detox and withdrawal is completed in less than one week, again, depending on the factors that determine the severity of the detox process.

Treatment for Alcohol Use Disorder

When deciding to enter treatment for an alcohol use disorder, it is common to feel apprehensive about the detox process. Unfortunately, too many people who are in need of treatment shy away from it due to the fear of experiencing withdrawal symptoms. It is important to overcome this concern, knowing that a quality detox program will have in place all necessary interventions to make the detox as comfortable as possible. In addition to providing physical comfort and relief from symptoms, the detox professionals also provide psychological support to help each client successfully complete the detox stage of recovery.

After detox is behind them, the client will then begin the actual addiction treatment program. Alcohol use disorders are best treated using a variety of interventions that work in tandem together. These treatment elements often include:

  • Psychotherapy. Cognitive behavioral therapy, dialectical behavior therapy, and contingency management are evidence-based therapies that have demonstrated success in treating addiction
  • Group therapy. Participating in small group counseling sessions can be a source of peer support and encouragement, as fellow clients in recovery share their own experiences and struggles
  • Medication assisted treatment. Naltrexone has been shown to help someone in the early months of alcohol addiction recovery by reducing alcohol cravings
  • Addiction education and relapse prevention planning. Gaining an understanding of how alcohol impacts the brain and leads to chemical dependency is essential in helping to deter relapse. Making a thorough relapse prevention plan is critical in identifying potential triggers and making a plan to manage them
  • 12 step or other recovery meetings. Social support is an intrinsic component in recovery, so active participation in a recovery community is a useful element in the treatment
  • Other therapies that complement psychotherapy. These might include experiential activities such as yoga class, meditation, journaling, art therapy, massage therapy, and acupuncture.

Golf Drug Rehab Will Guide You Through Alcohol Detox and Withdrawal

Golf Drug Rehab is an elite alcohol and drug rehabilitation program in Southern California. Situated in a spectacular coastal community, this luxury rehab offers the highest caliber detox team and treatment specialists for individuals with an alcohol use disorder. The rehab program begins with detox and is followed by multi-layered therapeutic interventions featuring the most up-to-date addiction treatment methods. As part of the rehab programming, our clients will enjoy some recreational therapy with access to three outstanding local golf courses. For more information about this premier treatment program, please contact Golf Drug Rehab today at [phone_number]